Executive Intelligence Review

FROM EIR DAILY ALERT


Push-Back in Mexico Against Soros ‘Opium War’ Drive

July 31, 2018 (EIRNS)—President Trump’s “No” to drug legalization should cost the Soros-controlled designee for Interior Minister, Olga Sanchez Cordero, her job in the incoming López Obrador Administration, an important social media support network for the Mexican President-elect has suggested.

“El Chapucero,” an internet social media site which played a key role in mobilizing support for the election of Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO), launched an attack on the Interior Minister-designee on July 29, warning that she is in danger of being replaced as the designated Interior Minister for her call for drug legalization.

López Obrador hasn’t called for drug legalization since his election, but the minister-designate has, and “there has already been someone who said ‘no’ to this, and he’s called Donald Trump,” the El Chapucero host said. This is “a ‘no’ from the United States of Donald Trump,” coming right in the middle of the developing “romance and honeymoon” between López Obrador and Donald Trump, when they are discussing signing “a new NAFTA agreement which could save the peso.” And legalization is not necessary, nor are Mexicans demanding it, El Chapucero asserted emphatically.

Sanchez Cordero, an extremely well-to-do former Supreme Court justice, has also come out in opposition to the President-elect’s stated policy of cutting all public officials’ salaries, at least with regard to Sanchez’s buddies in the Judiciary. That is adding to her problems, El Chapucero stated.

The Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong of the outgoing Peña Nieto government added his voice on July 27 to those opposing Sanchez Cordero and the drug cartels’ push for legalizing drugs (both marijuana and opium poppies). Legalization won’t reduce the violence in the country; that requires having well-trained and well-equipped police, Osorio said firmly.

Osorio is not from AMLO’s movement, but from the nationalist wing of the PRI party, and he has been named leader of the PRI faction in the Senate come September when the new Congress enters. That bodes well for the otherwise-fractured Congress, since Osorio is known as a patriotic figure, rather than a partisan politician out to score points.

T